Minneapolis Newspaper Index at University of MN now online

hclib:

Digitized Index Cards to Minneapolis Newspapers

Van Houlson, Journalism Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries

For many years, the index cards to the Minneapolis Star and the Minneapolis Tribune at the Wilson Library on the University of Minnesota campus gave researchers a unique tool for locating articles on local people and events. This index was recently scanned by the Digital Collections unit at the University of Minnesota Libraries and is now available for searching as a public access website called the Minneapolis Newspaper Index (https://www.lib.umn.edu/newspapers).

Use this search engine to find articles from the Minnesota Daily (1900-1922, 1963-1977), Minneapolis Tribune (1940-1945,1950-1954) and the Minneapolis Star (1964-1970). Search for keywords found in the headlines of articles or among the subject headings used to organize the card file. This is a fascinating resource for anyone interested in Minneapolis history and will also display the actual image of the original card, revealing the work of dedicated library staff over decades as they added citations about local people, architecture, events and other developments. The Minneapolis Newspaper Index opens up new possibilities for researching local Minnesota history in the 20th century that is currently not possible using any existing newspaper content in print, microfilm, or online.

I can personally vouch for Van’s commitment to thinking creatively about ways these types of valuable resources can be preserved.

Digitization is changing historical research in profound and important ways (some potentially good, others potentially bad) but it is thrilling to see the University of Minnesota Libraries carry on a long commitment to preserving newspapers as a key part of the historical record.

thedailywhat:

How About That of the Day: La Bougie du Sapeur (Sapper’s Candle) — named after a French comic-book character born on Leap Day — is a satirical newspaper founded in 1980 which is published only once every four years, on February 29th.
Jean d’Indy, editor of the quadrennial newspaper, says he and his writers gather at a restaurant ahead of Leap Day, and down a bottle of bubbly before getting down to brass tacks.
“We try not to be naughty; we just try to be funny,” d’Indy says. “But we are not funny. Life is funny. So, it’s the way of seeing life which is funny.”
Whatever that means.
The paper sells for $5 a copy, and all proceeds go to benefit charities. With a circulation of 150,000, La Bougie du Sapeur easily outsells all other French papers published today.
D’Indy says at one point he considered offering subscriptions, but dropped the idea when he realized it would too difficult to track down subscribers every four years.
[npr.]

thedailywhat:

How About That of the Day: La Bougie du Sapeur (Sapper’s Candle) — named after a French comic-book character born on Leap Day — is a satirical newspaper founded in 1980 which is published only once every four years, on February 29th.

Jean d’Indy, editor of the quadrennial newspaper, says he and his writers gather at a restaurant ahead of Leap Day, and down a bottle of bubbly before getting down to brass tacks.

“We try not to be naughty; we just try to be funny,” d’Indy says. “But we are not funny. Life is funny. So, it’s the way of seeing life which is funny.”

Whatever that means.

The paper sells for $5 a copy, and all proceeds go to benefit charities. With a circulation of 150,000, La Bougie du Sapeur easily outsells all other French papers published today.

D’Indy says at one point he considered offering subscriptions, but dropped the idea when he realized it would too difficult to track down subscribers every four years.

[npr.]

(Source: thedailywhat)

Bicycle advertisements; Newspaperdom, July 30 (Keating) and August 13 (Columbia), 1896.

In the 1890s, in the midst of America’s “bike boom,” newspaper managers encouraged their reporters to use the machines as a way to crisscross congested cities quickly and easily. Ads for bicycle companies started showing up in the journalism trade press during this period, as did articles noting the steady rise in the number of female journalists.

Newspaperdom, December 26, 1895.
Same as it ever was? Same as it ever was.

Newspaperdom, December 26, 1895.

Same as it ever was? Same as it ever was.

Advertisement, Newspaperdom, March, 1894.
Makers of Linotype: The Film announced yesterday that they’re in the final stages of editing in preparation for their world premiere on February 3, 2012 in New York City.
The film is all about the most revolutionary innovation in mass communication technology that you’ve never heard of. We here at practical obscurity* have been excited about this film since May! Here’s hoping for a Twin Cities screening!

Advertisement, Newspaperdom, March, 1894.

Makers of Linotype: The Film announced yesterday that they’re in the final stages of editing in preparation for their world premiere on February 3, 2012 in New York City.

The film is all about the most revolutionary innovation in mass communication technology that you’ve never heard of. We here at practical obscurity* have been excited about this film since May! Here’s hoping for a Twin Cities screening!

Christmas Fun Fact

The tune for “Hark, The Herald Angels Sing” comes from a song Felix Mendelssohn wrote in 1840 to honor Johann Gutenberg and the bicentennial of the invention of the printing press.

Thanks to my big sister Erin for tossing this little knowledge nugget my way after church this morning.

Advertisement, Printer’s Ink, June 24, 1903.
Printer’s Ink was a bi-weekly trade magazine for the publishing industry that ran from 1888 to 1967.
The Minneapolis Journal ran from 1888 to 1939, when it was purchased by, and merged with, the Minneapolis Star.

Advertisement, Printer’s Ink, June 24, 1903.

Printer’s Ink was a bi-weekly trade magazine for the publishing industry that ran from 1888 to 1967.

The Minneapolis Journal ran from 1888 to 1939, when it was purchased by, and merged with, the Minneapolis Star.

Peterson v. Western Union Tel. Co., 65 Minn. 18; 67 N.W. 646 (1896)

Minnesota Supreme Court rules that a telegraph message reading “Slippery Sam, your name is pants,” sent to State Senator Samuel Peterson (New Ulm) is libelous on its face.

(Later, in Peterson v. Western Union Tel. Co., 75 Minn. 368; 77 N.W. 985 (1899), the court ruled that the award of $2,000 was excessive and ordered a new trial unless Peterson agreed to take $1,000 instead.)

1 2