Newspapers phasing out Newspapers phasing out copy editorsNewspapers phasing out

Newspapers phasing out Newspapers phasing out copy editorsNewspapers phasing out

Reporters Interviewing Children In Connecticut School Shooting Adds Little News Value, Experts Say

I saw lots of “dear media: stop interviewing the children!” pleas on various social media yesterday following the shooting in Newtown, Connecticut. I did not see a lot of clear explanations forwhy not(it’s social media, after all). Don’t we need every available piece of information in the immediate aftermath of such an incident? Can there benovalue in carefully asking the children what they saw? 

This Michael Calderone piece is a lucid discussion.

The upshot: interviews with the traumatized young witnesses could have a value that outweighs a knee-jerk reaction to leave them be, especially in the early going. But there are lots of good reasons why their descriptions may not be accurate or useful, in addition to adding to their trauma.

People use the phrase ‘the fog of war,’ but this is a case that seems to be the fog of law.

Eugene Fidell military law researcher/lecturer, Yale University

Manning Plea Offer Another Odd Piece of an Odd Case | NPR

I don’t know if this dissertation is any good, but if I could choose to make any impact at all, I’d like to see more legal scholars use the term “foggy doctrine” once it’s published. Foggy doctrine.

A conversation with my mom about newspapers’ candidate endorsements

This is so one-sided it can hardly be considered a “conversation,” but I thought it was worth posting since it might provoke some discussion.

On Saturday, Oct. 27, The Des Moines Register announced it was endorsing Mitt Romney for president. This surprised a lot of folks, and outraged some, in part because the Register hadn’t endorsed a Republican in 40 years or so.

I grew up in Iowa and recently moved back. My folks still live here. It is, as you probably know, a swing state.

The following conversation, had via text message right before the start of the baseball game Sunday night, has been edited a little for clarity purposes (spelling):

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Granite City school suspends multiple students over Twitter comments

This is a really good case study on a growing problem in schools across the country.

Sooner or later, the U.S. Supreme Court is going to have to elaborate on its declaration that students do not “shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate.”

usnatarchives:

This confidential cable to RFK from the State Department is just one of almost 3,000 pages of records released to the public this week. 

Seven boxes of material (more than 2,700 pages) from the Robert F. Kennedy Papers, housed at the Kennedy Library in Boston, are now online. These digitized documents are mostly related to the Cuban Missile Crisis.
What are you doing to celebrate Day of Digital of Archives?

usnatarchives:

This confidential cable to RFK from the State Department is just one of almost 3,000 pages of records released to the public this week. 

Seven boxes of material (more than 2,700 pages) from the Robert F. Kennedy Papers, housed at the Kennedy Library in Boston, are now online. These digitized documents are mostly related to the Cuban Missile Crisis.

What are you doing to celebrate Day of Digital of Archives?

(via todaysdocument)

"These guys … know how to control their emotions…"

- Buster Posey, talking about his teammates as they uncork in the locker room after winning their division series.

Minneapolis Newspaper Index at University of MN now online

hclib:

Digitized Index Cards to Minneapolis Newspapers

Van Houlson, Journalism Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries

For many years, the index cards to the Minneapolis Star and the Minneapolis Tribune at the Wilson Library on the University of Minnesota campus gave researchers a unique tool for locating articles on local people and events. This index was recently scanned by the Digital Collections unit at the University of Minnesota Libraries and is now available for searching as a public access website called the Minneapolis Newspaper Index (https://www.lib.umn.edu/newspapers).

Use this search engine to find articles from the Minnesota Daily (1900-1922, 1963-1977), Minneapolis Tribune (1940-1945,1950-1954) and the Minneapolis Star (1964-1970). Search for keywords found in the headlines of articles or among the subject headings used to organize the card file. This is a fascinating resource for anyone interested in Minneapolis history and will also display the actual image of the original card, revealing the work of dedicated library staff over decades as they added citations about local people, architecture, events and other developments. The Minneapolis Newspaper Index opens up new possibilities for researching local Minnesota history in the 20th century that is currently not possible using any existing newspaper content in print, microfilm, or online.

I can personally vouch for Van’s commitment to thinking creatively about ways these types of valuable resources can be preserved.

Digitization is changing historical research in profound and important ways (some potentially good, others potentially bad) but it is thrilling to see the University of Minnesota Libraries carry on a long commitment to preserving newspapers as a key part of the historical record.

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